18 Bishop Court, Lawnton, Qld 450118 Bishop Court, Lawnton, Qld 4501

BUILT 2007, MANAGED & SOLD AT 2% BY LJ GILLAND REAL ESTATE

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propertymanagement #propertymanagers #propertymarketing #competitive #commission #win #win #relationship #happyvendor #happytenant #resultdriven #gratitudeattitude LindaandCarlos Debello Linda J.姬琳达珍 Gilland (Debello) Linda-Jane 姬琳达珍 Gilland(Debello)

https://ljgilland.blogspot.com/2020/07/property-investor-testimonials.html

18 Bishop Court, Lawnton, Qld 4501 https://www.realestate.com.au/property-house-qld-lawnton-133738778

LJ Gilland Real Estate has been involved with the complete Lawnton Development as Investors ourselves since inception and we have had few tenants in 18 Bishop and for example, we have had the same tenant in place at 12 Bishop since new, achieving a great comparable rent. http://ljgrealestate.com.au/property/18-bishop-court-lawnton-qld-4501/

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Australia’s ‘watergate’: here’s what taxpayers need to know about water buybacks

 

Australia’s ‘watergate’: here’s what taxpayers need to know about water buybacks

In 2017, the then agriculture minister, Barnaby Joyce, signed off on an A$80 million purchase of a water entitlement from a company called Eastern Australia Agriculture.

The problem is that Energy Minister Angus Taylor used to be a director of Eastern Australia Agriculture – though he didn’t have a financial interest – and the company is a liberal party donor. What’s more, the value of the water purchased for A$80 million is under question.

Now, as the election looms, this issue has resurfaced. But why should taxpayers be concerned?

Water buybacks using an open tender were halted by the current government in 2015, even though this is the most cost-effective way to set aside water for the environment. Instead, the government pronounced that subsidies for irrigators were a better deal.

Until 2015, the government bought back most water using an open tender process, before it was replaced by a subsidy scheme for irrigation and occasional closed tenders.

The problem with the closed tender process is that it tends to lack transparency, which raises questions about how effectively the government is spending public money. And it’s hard to prove closed tenders deliver the most cost effective outcome.

The Murray-Darling Basin is a very productive agricultural zone and its rivers have been used to boost agricultural outputs through irrigation.

State governments spent much of the 20th century allocating this water to agricultural users. By the 1990s it was clear too much water was being extracted. This resulted in both harm to the river environment and potential reduced reliability for those with existing water rights.

Various attempts to rein in extractions were made around this time, but ultimately the Murray-Darling Basin Plan was adopted to deal with the problem.

In agreeing on the plan, the federal government committed to spending A$13 billion to reduce the amount of water being extracted from the Murray-Darling Basin. To accomplish this the government has two basic strategies.

One involves buying up existing rights for water use. The other hinges on using subsidies so farmers use less water when irrigating.

Reducing water extraction from the basin

The second approach of using subsidies is generally more politically appealing. This is because few farmers ever object to receiving a subsidy and the public has an affinity with the idea of “saving” water.

The problem, however, is that subsidies are a more costly way of returning water to the river system than simply buying back existing water rights. And so-called water savings are hard to measure how much water savings are a result of subsidies or some other factor.

This is why some analysts even claim subsidies are reducing the level of water available for the environment.

Buying back water rights is generally more cost-effective than providing subsidies. But a clear and transparant process still matters because water rights are not the same for everyone and it’s a complex process to determine their overall value.

Allocations and entitlements

First, most water users hold a legal right, known as an entitlement. Water entitlements represent the long-term amount of water that can be taken and used – subject to rain, of course.

Second, water allocations represent the amount of water currently available against a given entitlement – this is the water that is available now.

If a farmer owns an entitlement in the River Murray, chances are the annual allocation will be determined by how much water has flowed into upstream storages like Hume Dam, Dartmouth Dam or Lake Eildon.

Even then the allocation will vary, depending on which state issued the original entitlement. For instance, New South Wales water is generally allocated more aggressively. This means NSW entitlements tend to be less reliable in dry years than Victorian or South Australian entitlements.

If a farmer owns an entitlement where there are no upstream storages, as is the case with much of the Darling River system, then the allocation will vary depending on how much water is flowing in the river.

So what?

All of this means the amount of water that can actually be used for the environment when an entitlement passes to the government will depend heavily on the underlying characteristics of the water right.

Partly for this reason, water buybacks were historically conducted using an open tender process.

This meant the government would announce its willingness to buy water entitlements. Farmers would then notify the government about what entitlements they held and the price they were prepared to take.

Running an open tender allowed the government to assess the value for money of the different entitlements on offer at the time.

Water buybacks through open tender began seriously in about 2007 to 2008. This meant the price owners were prepared to sell for would be registered, and then the government would determine which offer provided the best value. Around 60% of all water now held for the environment by the Commonwealth was secured through open tenders.

As a general rule, a relatively high-reliability water entitlement was bought for about $2,000 per megalitre and this has become the metric for many in the market. But the current government halted this process in 2015.

Now, the government buys water through direct negotiation with water-entitlement holders.

The government justified ending open-tender buybacks on the basis that the water being secured was causing undue harm to rural and regional communities. And, instead, much more expensive subsidies would supposedly generate a better overall return.

This view is not universally shared. The receipts from openly tendered water entitlements were being used by many farmers to adjust their business, while still staying in the region.

Many rural communities continue to thrive, regardless of the strategy chosen to secure water for the environment. Subsidies also tend to favour particular irrigators rather than the community in general.

Having set aside the cheapest option of open-tender buybacks and declaring support for irrigation subsidies, the problem the government now faces is that it must explain why closed tenders persisted (albeit in isolated cases) and were signed off by Ministers as good value for money.

Closed tenders need not deliver a poor outcome for taxpayers. But it does mean the likelihood of establishing the best value for money is reduced, simply because there are fewer reference points.

And if it’s legitimate to overspend public money on irrigation infrastructure subsidies, the credibility of a supposedly cost-effective closed tender is also brought into question.

Economics and Head of School, University of South Australia

Disclosure statement

Professor Lin Crase is the South Australian branch president of the Australasian Agriculture and Resource Economics Society.

Partners

University of South Australia provides funding as a member of The Conversation AU.

http://theconversation.com/australias-watergate-heres-what-taxpayers-need-to-know-about-water-buybacks-115838

Posted in Australian Properties, Empowerment, Foreign Investment, HOME, infrastructure, Interest Rates & Global Economy, LANDLORDS, ljgrealestate, MAINTENANCE, Property Investment, Property Law, Property Management & Sales, QUEENSLAND, sino australia investment, TENANTS | Tagged | 1 Comment

Quarterly rents have increased across all capital cities, bar Sydney and Darwin.

Brisbane rents are starting to climb again, with Brisbane now having a median weekly rent of $436. This is an increase of 0.8 per cent over the past quarter, and 1.4 per cent over the past 12 months.

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At a glance:

  • CoreLogic has released its first Quarterly Rental Review for 2019, showing rents have risen by 1 per cent during the first three months of this year.
  • Sydney is the most expensive capital city to rent with a median weekly rent of $582 per week, while Perth is the cheapest at $385.
  • Quarterly rents have increased across all capital cities, bar Darwin and Sydney.

The first CoreLogic Quarterly Rental Review for 2019, which tracks median rents and rental yields across Australia, shows that national weekly rents have risen by 1 per cent during the first three months of the year.

“This seasonally strong first quarter has delivered the highest increase in weekly rents since the corresponding first quarter a year ago”, says Cameron Kusher, Research Analyst for CoreLogic. “Our regional housing markets are performing marginally better than the capital cities, many of which have been experiencing weaker rental…

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Related-party rental valuations are fast becoming the next big COVID challenge for SMSF trustees.

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With property values reaching a record high across Australia since the onset of COVID, the outcome is much bleaker for the rental market.

Commercial properties’national vacancy rate has hit 11.75 per centdue to entire offices working from home, and further increases may be on the way.

Rental lease agreements

With flexible working arrangements becoming commonplace, the ability to command pre-COVID rents has been significantly affected. Many landlords are currently offering lease agreements with several incentives to lure tenants back into the market.

The problem for related-party tenants is that the specific incentive terms are not always publicly available as negotiations occur behind closed doors.

While there may be anecdotal evidence to support the rapidly changing nature of commercial lease agreements, SMSF auditors may not consider this to be sufficient appropriate audit evidence at audit.

Market value

Regulation 8.02B of theSIS Regulationsrequires that all assets must be…

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The Gold Coast was second at 36 (with annual growth of 3.2%), followed by Brisbane at 44 (2.5% growth).

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  • Luxury residential price growth was strongest in the smaller Australian cities over 2020, according to the results of the Prime International Residential Index (PIRI 100) in the forthcoming edition of Knight Frank’s The Wealth Report 2021.

The PIRI 100, which tracks the movement of luxury residential prices across the world’s top 100 residential markets, found five Australian cities – Perth, the Gold Coast, Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne – were ranked in the top 65 for luxury residential market performance over the past year.

But it was the smaller cities of Perth, the Gold Coast and Brisbane that were the strongest performing, recording annual price growth greater than the global average of 1.9%.

Perth was the top ranked city in Australia, coming in at number 34 with 3.6% annual growth, up from 0.9% one year earlier, when it was ranked 63 – and the last Australian ranked city.

The Gold Coast…

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RE important update about the changes to Facebook

DEAR WHOEVER NOW WITH REALESTATE.COM

Does that mean that the FEES will be changed to the market overall?

We’ve been paying too much for your advertising for years.

Maybe this scenario make you understand that you are not the monopoly.

An update from realestate.com.au

Today Facebook has restricted publishers and people in Australia from sharing or viewing Australian and international news content.

Sharing property listings, Agent Profiles and Agency Profiles may be restricted. We are working with Facebook to have this matter resolved.

alex.osborn.

Kind regards,
The team at realestate.com.au

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In general a good concept. But Also remember two other great pieces of advice.

In general a good concept. But Also remember two other great pieces of advice. 1) Make haste slowly 2) Plans succeed through good counsel; don’t go to war without wise advice. (Proverbs 20:18).https://www.influencive.com/creating-the-inevitability-of-success-mindset/

Posted in Empowerment, LJ Gilland Real Estate Pty Ltd, ljgrealestate, MAINTENANCE, Property Investment, Property Management & Sales, QUEENSLAND | Leave a comment

How to Unclog a Toilet When You Don’t Have a PlungerSo, you’ve clogged your friend’s toilet and there’s no plunger in sight. Don’t panic. Here’s what to do.

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-unclog-a-toilet-when-there-is-no-plunger-1820623969%3Futm_medium=sharefromsite%26utm_source=lifehacker_email&utm_campaign

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https://lindajdebello.wordpress.com/2021/01/10/83801/
— Read on lindajdebello.wordpress.com/2021/01/10/83801/

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Two Worlds: So Much Prosperity, So Much Skepticism on Collaborative Fund

You should read this: Housel’s cracking book on the psychology of money is also a must-read.

A couple of the key takeaways were:

-understanding ‘how much is enough’ (instead of succumbing to greed); and

-understanding the power of compound growth to generate wealth and returns.

Because the big gains come later as a result of compounding, the winners are not necessarily those with the fastest annual returns, but those with the stomach to stick with successful strategies for the longest period of time.

It’s why Buffett generated most of his wealth after the traditional retirement date.

And it’s why the family home so often proves to the only genuinely successful investment many folks ever make.

Not because the returns are spectacular necessarily – often they aren’t – but because it’s the one asset people stick with long enough to experience the benefits of compounding.

The problem with more volatile investments is often that investors bail when trouble surfaces, as it periodically does.

http://www.collaborativefund.com/blog/two-worlds/

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Settlements, valuations looming as post-COVID challenge

Settlements, valuations looming as post-COVID challenge

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Australia’s post-pandemic sales surge and the continuing deluge of refinancing applications is resulting in settlement delays, while at the same time lower-than-expected valuations are beginning to cause headaches for homebuyers.

While positivity has been flowing through Australian property markets for much of the last three months, fuelling price growth predictions throughout 2021, first homebuyers and small business owners are reporting emerging challenges in obtaining finance.

Pitcher Partners client director Jason Fallscheer toldAustralian Property Investor Magazinethat banks were already near capacity dealing with a big pile of refinancing applications with interest rates at historic lows, and the recent sales surge had resulted in an increasing number of settlement deadlines being missed.

“I’m not trying to be alarmist, it’s just a fact,” Mr Fallscheer said.

“If you rang up a Big Four bank with a 30-day settlement, in most instances they would struggle to meet settlement.

“For the 2020 year…

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Settlements, valuations looming as post-COVID challenge

Australia’s post-pandemic sales surge and the continuing deluge of refinancing applications is resulting in settlement delays, while at the same time lower-than-expected valuations are beginning to cause headaches for homebuyers.

While positivity has been flowing through Australian property markets for much of the last three months, fuelling price growth predictions throughout 2021, first homebuyers and small business owners are reporting emerging challenges in obtaining finance.

Pitcher Partners client director Jason Fallscheer told Australian Property Investor Magazine that banks were already near capacity dealing with a big pile of refinancing applications with interest rates at historic lows, and the recent sales surge had resulted in an increasing number of settlement deadlines being missed.

“I’m not trying to be alarmist, it’s just a fact,” Mr Fallscheer said.

“If you rang up a Big Four bank with a 30-day settlement, in most instances they would struggle to meet settlement.

“For the 2020 year, a lot of banks’ home loan-writing demand has been fuelled by cash back incentives, and people are still chasing cash back. 

“Those incentives kept people busy during a period of low activity when there weren’t a lot of sales going through, the problem is that refinance activity continued and the sales have kicked in, and it’s just led to a surge in volume.

“When you haven’t got your backlog cleared and there is a surge in volume, it means that you can’t cope.”

Mr Fallscheer said delays in settlement were an issue affecting small business owners most harshly, with onerous application processes hindering their ability to obtain a new loan or refinance an existing one to lock in a lower rate.

“I’ve got one file that I submitted in May that hasn’t been drawn down yet,” he said.

“This is for a self-employed tradesperson, and now the bank is asking for a description as to what’s happening with their income related to COVID. 

“Every application you have to comment on whether you’ve been affected by COVID, and if they’re in small business and have received any sort of incentive, it’s likely that their accountant will need to prepare 2020 financials and have them submitted before the bank will look at the application.

“If you’re in small business and ring up your accountant and say ‘can I have my tax return submitted please’, they will need to do it ahead of their usual schedule and  this can trigger tax payable when for years these may have been done in February or March.

“It’s easy if it’s you or me, where we would have one employer and maybe some shares and an investment property, but if you’re talking about a whole business, it’s a big ask.”

Mr Fallscheer said there was also additional scrutiny being applied to valuations, particularly in markets where transactions ground to a halt earlier in the year because of the pandemic, or regional areas with historically low levels of transaction activity.

He said while it was a limited sample size, three of his clients had reported valuation shortfalls this month, and had been forced to chip in more cash.

“In all three cases where the valuations came in short the clients still wanted to buy the property but it creates an additional hurdle,” Mr Fallscheer said.

“There’s no doubt there’s an activity bubble in property to qualify for the stimulus and it’s leading to an increased element of urgency in the first home owner community.”

His advice to those currently searching for a home was to negotiate a subject-to-valuation clause as well as the conventional subject-to-finance condition in the purchase contract.

“It’s only an extra two words but subject to finance and valuation would be the preference,” Mr Fallscheer said.

“The finance may well be approved but if the valuation comes in short the transaction simply may not work.”

Posted in Australian Properties, BUSINESS LEASE BUY MANAGE COMMERCIAL, China, Empowerment, Foreign Investment, HOME, infrastructure, Interest Rates & Global Economy, LANDLORDS, LJ Gilland Real Estate Pty Ltd, ljgrealestate, MAINTENANCE, Property Investment, Property Law, Property Management & Sales, QUEENSLAND, TENANTS | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Tax tips: 10 must-know depreciation terms

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You don’t need to be a depreciation expert but understanding some of the key concepts surrounding this complex area of taxation can help your ongoing investment strategy.

1. Capital works deduction

This is the depreciation deduction you can claim on the structural component of the building and any fixed assets. Some common examples include walls, doors, roofing, sinks and built-in kitchen cabinetry.

Capital works deductions can be claimed under division 43 at a rate of 2.5 per cent for up to forty years on any residential property where construction commenced after 15 September 1987. But if a property is older than this and has undergone a structural renovation, such as retiling a kitchen, some capital works deductions will be available.

2. Plant and equipment

This category of depreciation refers to the easily removable or mechanical fixtures and fittings in a property. Floor coverings, furniture and air-conditioning units are some examples…

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